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Sacramento, California to become the First City to get 5G Coverage

On Wednesday, the American telecommunications conglomerate Verizon had announced its plans to launch wireless 5G service in three to five US cities by the end of 2018 – one year earlier than expected.

Among those, Sacramento (one of the cities Verizon had previously selected for preliminary testing) is scheduled to be the first one to get access to the network, which the company claims to be as many as 10 to 100 times faster than any of its existing cellular connections.

“Verizon estimates the market opportunity for initial 5G residential broadband services to be approximately 30 million households nationwide,” said the company in a statement, promising further details on market deployments to follow in the upcoming months.

The announcement comes after successful trials Verizon had conducted in 11 US markets earlier this year.

Verizon to roll out its 5G service late next year. Image credit: Mike Mozart via flickr.com, CC BY 2.0.

Unlike its predecessors, the service will use radio signals instead of copper or fibre cables, with additional features – such as mobile and IoT (Internet of things) applications – to come as the technology evolves.

Hans Vestberg, President of Global Networks and Chief Technology Officer at Verizon expressed his gratitude to the company’s partners and imagined a bright future expected to arrive on the heels of the early launch.

“We appreciate our strong ecosystem partners for their passion and technological support in helping us drive forward with 5G industry standards, for both fixed and mobile applications,” said Vestberg.

The targeted initial deployments are expected to provide a strong framework for accelerating 5G’s future deployment, and set a global standard.

Verizon also commented on its “confidence in new technology powered by millimetre-wave spectrum” (very high frequencies capable of carrying large amounts of data with minimal delay), which, hopefully, means the actual technology is here and ready for commercial applications.

Sources: cnet.com, theverge.com, prnewswire.com.

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